1. compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!
You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

    compoundchem:

    A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!

    You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

    Reblogged from: characterandwritinghelp
  2. heronswing:

Hey Crime Writers - don’t just have your detectives say bland things like “the fingerprints matched” - use correct terminology and make your writing precise. Here’s a cool little fingerprint chart to get you started.

    heronswing:

    Hey Crime Writers - don’t just have your detectives say bland things like “the fingerprints matched” - use correct terminology and make your writing precise. Here’s a cool little fingerprint chart to get you started.

    Reblogged from: writersyoga
  3. bookphile:

    Let’s make something clear:

    Just because I like a book, doesn’t mean you have to like it.

    At the same time, just because I don’t like a book, it doesn’t mean that you have to dislike it or that I suddenly dislike or hate you for liking it.

    Everyone has the right to like and dislike books and I promise my personal opinion of you will not change.

    However, if you, in any way, try to give me shit for having an opinion different than yours, then your ass is grass and I’m gonna mow it. 

    Reblogged from: thebookhangover
  4. fictionwritingtips:

    I compiled most of the writing websites I’ve mentioned on my blog into one post. I find a lot of these sites useful, so hopefully they can help you out!

    Imagination Prompt Generator: This give you a one-sentence writing prompt that will help you come up with ideas. I think it also allows you to set a ten minute timer for each prompt.

    Wridea: I really like this site because you can write down simple ideas that you can organize later and put into a bigger project. You can share these ideas or the site will help you randomly match ideas. It’s great for brainstorming and building a fully formed outline.

    List of Unusual Words — Here’s a site you can browse through that gives you a list of unusual words for every letting in the alphabet. If you’re looking to switch up your vocab, or looking to develop a way a character speaks, this is a good reference.

    Picometer — Here’s a writing progress meter that can be embedded on your site or blog. There’s also the Writertopia meter that shows word count/current mood. 

    Cut Up Machine: This website takes whatever words you typed or pasted into the box and rearranges your sentences. It’s not practical for writing a novel, but it might help with poetry OR coming up with ideas. Experiment with it and see what you can come up with.

    Orion’s Arm: This is a great website to use if you want to research worldbuilding or if you have science questions. There are tons of resources you can use.

    Word Frequency Counter: If you’re finding that you’re using the same words over and over again, this website should help. You’ll be able to count the frequency usage of each word in your text. This should help you switch up the words you’re using and understand where the problem might be.

    Phrase Frequency Counter: This is same site explained above, but it counts the phrases you’re using.

    My Writing Nook: This allows you to write or jot down ideas wherever you are. You don’t need to have your laptop in order to access it, so it might help you during this time. You can write as long as you have your phone.

    Writer: The Internet Typewriter - This site lets you write, save, share, and/or convert your writing online. I tried it out and it’s pretty cool. It saves for you and is a great way to brainstorm or plan out some ideas.

    The Forge - The Forge is a fantasy, creature, spell, and location name generator. It’s awesome.

    One Word: This site gives you one word to write about for 60 seconds. This should help you get started with your own writing and will work as a writing prompt to get you warmed up. It’s a great way to get yourself motivated.

    Confusing Words:  On this site you can search through confusing words that often stump many writers. It’s not a huge reference, but it should help you with some writing/grammar issues.

    Cliché Finder: This site allows you to enter parts of your writing and it will search for clichés. If you find that you’re using the same phrases over and over again, this will help a lot. I haven’t messed around with it too much, but it looks useful.

    Hand Written Fonts: If you’re looking for great hand written fonts, this is a great reference. All of them are pretty awesome.

    Tip of My Tongue — you know when you’re trying to think of a specific word, but you just can’t remember what it is? This site will help you narrow down your thoughts and find that word you’ve been looking for. It can be extremely frustrating when you have to stop writing because you get a stuck on a word, so this should help cut that down. 

    -Kris Noel

    Reblogged from: fixyourwritinghabits
  5. ludicrouslexicon:

    What was is like to live during different eras of history? When writing something that doesn’t occur in the present or future, this is important to consider.

    Roman Times

    Ancient China

    Ancient India

    Medieval Europe

    Renaissance Europe

    Victorian England

    If you’re planning on writing a novel, you are likely going to have to do far more extensive research than what I have compiled here, but hopefully these can serve as a starting point. I will try to find more sources on a wider variety of cultures (I am aware that this list is very Euro-centric) in future posts. Ideally, I would like to come up with different lists specifically for Victorian England, WWI germany, the persian empire, etc. and list them to be searched by tags on my blog.

    I also hope for a day when I have enough followers to take requests on what you would like a master list of!

    Reblogged from: writingwithcolor
  6. yeahwriters:

The Dinosaurs on Other Planets by Danielle McLaughlin
The fiction piece in this week’s New Yorker is absolutely magnificent. The pieces are always very well written from week to week, but this little story is a structural and architectural masterpiece, in my opinion. And it’s so subtle, the epitome of show-don’t-tell. I could write an entire thesis just on this story, oh my goodness. What an A+ piece of psychological realism.
There also a little supplementary interview on newyorker.com where McLaughlin answers questions about the story, which is always interesting to read as a writer.
But like seriously you have to go read this story. Right now. Go.

    yeahwriters:

    The Dinosaurs on Other Planets by Danielle McLaughlin

    The fiction piece in this week’s New Yorker is absolutely magnificent. The pieces are always very well written from week to week, but this little story is a structural and architectural masterpiece, in my opinion. And it’s so subtle, the epitome of show-don’t-tell. I could write an entire thesis just on this story, oh my goodness. What an A+ piece of psychological realism.

    There also a little supplementary interview on newyorker.com where McLaughlin answers questions about the story, which is always interesting to read as a writer.

    But like seriously you have to go read this story. Right now. Go.

    Reblogged from: yeahwriters
  7. mychemicalbooks:

    The best part of writing is when you can’t stop the words pouring out; you are in such a rush to see them inked they tumble seamlessly out of your heart, your mind, and just you. You loose yourself in their constant flow, and that trance you’re in is truly the most wonderful thing about writing. 

    Reblogged from: tea-books-and-blankets
  8. maxkirin:

+ DAILY WRITER POSITIVITY +

#130
It’s okay to be real.
Sometimes you will find yourself writing about the ugly things in our world, and that’s okay. If your story demands that you tackle these subjects, then do it. Talking about them will forever be greater than pretending they’re not there.

Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

    maxkirin:

    + DAILY WRITER POSITIVITY +

    #130

    It’s okay to be real.

    Sometimes you will find yourself writing about the ugly things in our world, and that’s okay. If your story demands that you tackle these subjects, then do it. Talking about them will forever be greater than pretending they’re not there.

    Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

    Reblogged from: maxkirin
  9. Reblogged from: agonyofanuntoldstory
  10. hello095:

    CREATE WITH CARE
    ~A random plot generator inspired from this~

    Rules

    • Drag each image once onto a darkly coloured background
    • Do not drag until you find something

    You can use these as writing prompts individually or use them all in one go to create a wacky story! How you can write this can be decided by you :)

    Sorry about the text, you really have to look closely at it to distinguish what is written there.

    Reblogged from: writersrelief
  11. Hello hello my lovelies! 

    I’m participating in All Hallow’s Read this year (a kind of Secret Santa for book nerds, around Halloween), and I need to post a wishlist for my Secret Santa! (: 

    Here are some books that I’ve been wanting for a super long time:

    • Love & Misadventure by: Lang Leav
    • The Moon and More by: Sarah Dessen
    • Midnight’s Children by: Salman Rushdie
    • The Monstrumologist by: Rick Yancey
    • The Dream Thieves by: Maggie Stiefvater
    • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by: Benjamin Alire Saenz
    • The Knife of Never Letting Go by: Patrick Ness

    And I love paperback and hardcover equally! 

    Happy All Hallow’s Read! (: 

  12. saucywenchwritingblog:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

THIS!  I see so many people post art or stories and say it’s just a drabble or doodle, it probably isn’t any good, people aren’t going to like it. 
There are always going to be people who are willing to tear you down.  Don’t do their work for them.  Even if you can’t say good things, it doesn’t mean you have to say negative things. 

    saucywenchwritingblog:

    naamahdarling:

    howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

    mirrepp:

    Some harsh but very very true words

    When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

    "this is an old image…"

    "I’m not happy with that one…"

    "this is just a sketch…"

    "I did this really quickly…"

    "there is better stuff on later pages…"

    It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

    But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

    You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

    This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

    Be proud.




    This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

    Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

    Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

    Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

    i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

    THIS!  I see so many people post art or stories and say it’s just a drabble or doodle, it probably isn’t any good, people aren’t going to like it. 

    There are always going to be people who are willing to tear you down.  Don’t do their work for them.  Even if you can’t say good things, it doesn’t mean you have to say negative things. 

    Reblogged from: agonyofanuntoldstory
  13. Hi hi! (: It’s lovely to meet you (anonymously), and I can’t wait to see what you send me!! Thank you in advance! (: 

  14. writeworld:

    Writer’s Block


    In one sentence is the spark of a story. Ignite.

    Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a memory about this sentence. Write something about this sentence.

    Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

    Reblogged from: writeworld
  15. booksandsugarquills:

September Book Photo Challenge - Day 5: Bookstack

August/September Book Haul

    booksandsugarquills:

    September Book Photo Challenge - Day 5: Bookstack

    August/September Book Haul

    Reblogged from: tea-books-and-blankets
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