1. writingcareer:

    image

    Rosarium Publishing (est. 2013) is soliciting submissions for Stories for Chip: A Tribute to Samuel R. Delany, a celebratory anthology that pays respect and homage to Delaney and his literary contributions to the sci-fi/fantasy genre.

    During his prolific career Delany won four Nebula awards and two Hugo awards for his sci-fi novels. In 2013 the SFWA titled him the organization’s 30th SFWA Grand Master.

    Read More

    Reblogged from: characterandwritinghelp
  2. Reblogged from: itsonceuponabook
  3. Different Kinds of Readers.

    • The Devourer: Each book is a snack for this kind of reader--but it doesn't mean that s/he won't enjoy each book just as much.
    • The Lover: Books read by this kind of reader are read in hidden, stolen moments at the most unexpected times.
    • The Slow Dancer: Books are a treat that this kind of reader savors. Slow and steady wins this reader's race, as his/her eyes take in and taste each and every word.
    • The Addict: Books are a conquest to this kind of reader. S/he will buy more books than s/he can read, but s/he will ALWAYS have something to read.
    • The Classic: Books of the past are a gift to this reader. Prose in the style of early contemporary authors, or stories written long ago, are favorites for this reader.
    • The Die-Hard: Genres are a way of life for this reader. S/he finds a niche and sticks to it--veering from what s/he knows for short bursts of time.
    • The Advocate: This reader is a lover of books. S/he is not just a reader, but an advocate of reading--hoping that the future will contain more readers.
    • What kind of reader are you?
    Reblogged from: youngadultatbooktopia
  4. abookblog:

    books-and-cookies:

    readerxpro:

    HOW TO REMOVE PESKY STICKERS FROM YOUR BOOKS (contains naughty words)

    THIS IS A PSA.

    This is important

    Reblogged from: durnesque-esque
  5. booksnotlovers:

    It’s that time of the year again, in which I’m looking for new people to follow! Reblog and I might just stalk your lifeblog

    Reblogged from: booksnotlovers
  6. fyqueerlatinxs:

    Fuck Yeah Queer Latin@s in Books!

    1. Trauma Queen by Lovemme Corazón
    2. Chulito by Charles Rice-Gonzalez
    3. Down to the Bone by Maya Lazara Dole
    4. City of Night by John Rechy
    5. The Rain God by Arturo Islas
    6. The Dirty Girls Social Club by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez
    7. The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poetica by Maya Chinchilla
    8. Their Dogs Came with Them by Helena Maria Viramontes
    9. Make Love to Rage by Morgan Robyn Collado
    Reblogged from: fuckyeahchicanawriters
  7. Reblogged from: characterandwritinghelp
  8. amandaonwriting:

Writing Quote – Robert Hass
    Reblogged from: writeworld
  9. Books were safer than other people anyway.
    Neil Gaiman, The Ocean at the End of the Lane (via punkassbookjockeyz)
    Reblogged from: itsonceuponabook
  10. readformentalhealthweek:

    It’s Mental Health Week next week and above are some of the many novels which deal with mental health/illness and social/emotional issues. If you can, read at least one of these books (or any book that deals with mental health) next week and post about it with the tag readformentalhealthweek. Raise awareness, reduce the stigma, educate yourself, support others, and take care of yourself!

    Reblogged from: bibliophylum
  11. ehnlee:

    When we think of robots we think of this little cutie or the disguised type that Michael Bay likes to blow up in his Transformers movies, but it doesn’t have to end there. Here’s the low-down on some other automated amigos.

    • Types

    Androids: Man-made creations designed to look and act like humans.

    Automaton: A self-operating, non-electronic machine. Generally made to resemble humans or animals.

    Cyborg: Short for ‘cybernetic organism’, Cyborgs are humans with mechanical components.

    Drone: Usually an armed, remote-controlled vehicle designed to operate without an on-board human pilot.

    Mecha: Generally a large robot controlled by a human pilot, who wears the machine like a ‘suit’.

    There are in fact more types of robot than I care to mention for the purpose of this article, but those listed above are the kinds we might find more commonly in our fiction. So how do we go about making our robotic characters more… well, robotic than their human counterparts?

    • Emotion

    Robots (unless they’re an alien race from outer space) are created and programmed by human beings. It’s open to debate whether robots can be taught human emotions, although there are developments which suggest robots are able to recognise and interpret them.

    Regardless, a lack or restriction of emotion is just one element you can use to differentiate your robotic characters from your human ones (assuming that is what you want, of course…!).

    Most robots are depicted as relying on logic over emotion. They fail to be compromised by their ‘feelings’, either because they don’t have any or they are programmed to assess situations logically in order to find the most suitable conclusion. As a result, they cannot be emotionally damaged or have their feelings hurt. They will not weigh one person above another due to love or affection. If what is happening before them is deemed logically correct according to their programming, they will not intervene.

    Drones and Mecha are even more emotionless than any other type of robot, generally because they are controlled by a human (either within the machine itself or at a distance in real-time). They are tools to be used by humans and therefore have no opportunity or ability to give input on what they are being ordered to do.

    • Behaviour

    Even though some robots - like androids - are created to replicate and relate to human beings, there will be notable differences between their respective behaviours.

    In psychology, there are numerous key theories of what causes and motivates human behaviour. Regarding robots, it can be assumed that the majority will work through something like stimulus-response. For example:

    Stimulus: I’m injured. Response: Shut down minor functions and reroute power to preserve higher functions.

    Assuming your robotic characters are programmed down to the last binary sequence to absolutely not deviate from their coding, their behaviour will be stiff and abrupt, with no time allowed for consideration between actions. This means there will be a lack of empathy and anxiety when it comes down to decision-making.

    Robot characters are also less likely to develop habits that are not necessary to their functionality and purpose. Humans - when put under stress - may bite their nails, tap their feet or pace. Since robots can sometimes lack these emotions, then they are less likely to display the kind of behaviour that humans use as social cues. This can make it difficult for humans to read a robot, especially if its tone is flat and it has no ability to change its expression. Alternatively, robots may misinterpret certain human habits or find themselves unable to read seemingly obvious social cues.

    There may be certain behaviours and routines that your robot character displays that would not be necessary for a human to do (such as ‘updating’ knowledge, going into ‘stasis’, adjusting internal mechanisms, etc). Just as animals all have their own unique habits compared to us, a robot might have specific mannerisms of their own.

    It’s also interesting to look into what kind of self-destructive behaviours a robot might learn or develop. Strong anxiety, depression or prolonged stress can affect a human negatively, even causing them to do things that cause them harm. If your robotic character doesn’t totally lack an emotional side, it might be worth thinking about how they may adapt to long-term stresses.

    • Movement

    Most androids (disregarding some exceptions) have awkward, stiff movements as a result of being mechanical. They lack the fluidity of movement that humans have, as they are not made up of muscle and joints, but instead wires and mechanisms. It can be difficult for someone to develop a robot that has utterly realistic movements. Some even lack the body parts to replicate specific movements (such as having wheels instead of feet, for example).

    Remember, for Mecha, the movement is going to be heavier and slower, just as it is with the likes of the Cybertronians. Their size doesn’t permit for delicate, graceful movements when moving around human cities and architecture. This doesn’t mean they lack precision or an ability to use complicated combat styles, it just means they’re more likely to break things when moving from A to B.

    Cyborgs are part-human and part-robot, so they could display a mixture of both types of behaviour. Where they may come across as perfectly human in one minute, they may act out strange, ‘alien’ behaviours to the human eye in the next. For example, not blinking or yawning, sleeping with their eyes open, focusing on one thing for long periods of time without shifting their weight, not breathing, etc.

    • Sounds/Scents

    One way to bring a robotic character fully to life is to describe what kind of sounds it might make, and even how it might smell. That sounds strange.. it’s not like they’re going to be wearing cologne or perfume, but machinery does have a scent to it as do humans and animals. Also, because robotic characters are full of small mechanisms and processors, they may emit sounds as they move or engage in internal procedures, kind of like how our computers/laptops ‘breathe’ and make clunky, rumbling sounds when they’re switched on for long periods of time.

    These are just some things to get you thinking, but nothing beats your own research! Please see below for further resources and a list of the robots you absolutely have to know about…! Hopefully these will encourage you to click further afield and discover more about developing robotic technologies in our world.

    Happy writing!

    Resources

    Research

    Reblogged from: thewritershelpers
  12. pokemoneggs:

    friendly reminder that the only reason fictional characters “choose” anything is because real actual people write them that way

    Reblogged from: writersyoga
  13. pickeringtonlibrary:

This month is National Bullying Prevention Month, so we’re reblogging our YA book list from last October, a collection of novels in which the characters deal with bullying (or, in a few cases, are the bullies themselves). 
And more books have debuted since we originally created this list, so don’t forget about these:
Anatomy of a Misfit, by Andrea Portes
Tease, by Amanda Maciel
Falling Into Place, by Amy Zhang
More books are featured on our Pinterest board, and on the NYPL’s excellent list, with even more titles, posted here.   

    pickeringtonlibrary:

    This month is National Bullying Prevention Month, so we’re reblogging our YA book list from last October, a collection of novels in which the characters deal with bullying (or, in a few cases, are the bullies themselves). 

    And more books have debuted since we originally created this list, so don’t forget about these:

    More books are featured on our Pinterest board, and on the NYPL’s excellent list, with even more titles, posted here.   

    Reblogged from: books-cupcakes
  14. medievalpoc:

    image

    Theme Chosen by Medievalpoc Patrons: Fiction Week!

    Starting this Monday 10/6/14, Medievalpoc will be posting awesome fiction featuring diverse characters and stories, including Historical Fiction and Fantasy, Dystopian Lit, Steampunk and Sci Fi, from graphic novels to classic literature!

    Submit your favorites here.

    Previous Fiction Week posts.

    Reblogged from: writingwithcolor
  15. theyuniversity:

In each of the above pairs, the first word is the preferred American spelling; the second word is the preferred spelling in British English.
Learned can be both the past tense of learn and an adjective that means “educated, scholarly.”
If you’d like to see what other words are spelled/spelt differently between American and British English, read this article.

    theyuniversity:

    In each of the above pairs, the first word is the preferred American spelling; the second word is the preferred spelling in British English.

    Learned can be both the past tense of learn and an adjective that means “educated, scholarly.”

    If you’d like to see what other words are spelled/spelt differently between American and British English, read this article.

    Reblogged from: theyuniversity
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